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Showing posts from 2019

Interview _ David R Mellor

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David R Mellor is from Liverpool, England. He spent his late teen homeless in Merseyside. He found understanding and belief through words, and his work has been aired widely, at the BBC, The Tate, galleries and pubs, and everything in between. His books include the poetry collections, What A Catch (Mellordramatic, 2012) and Some Body (Mellordramatic, 2014). One of his poems has also been featured in Bollocks to Brexit: an Anthology of Poems and Short Fiction (CivicLeicester, 2019). In this interview, David talks about his writing: When did you start writing? In my early 20s, I started to carry a notebook with me everywhere I went. (Still do). I wasn’t that well educated at the time. To me, words... they were just words. After a while I saw them as what they were. Writing was a way of finding my voice after a very troubled childhood. I was published in the poetry press, then found a local publisher, and I’ve had three books out. I’ve played pubs, art galleries and ever

Interview _ Marija Todorova

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Marija Todorova  has worked for international organizations that include the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the Department for International Development (DFID), and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE). She is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Her research interests include interpreters in mediation, intercultural education, and visual representation in translation. Todorova is an Executive Council member of International Association for Translation and Intercultural Studies (IATIS). She holds a PhD in Translation Studies from the Hong Kong Baptist University, and a PhD in Peace and Development Studies from University Ss. Cyril and Methodius Skopje. In this interview, Maria Todorova talks about translation, peacebuilding and Journeys in Translation : What would you say is the role of translation or translation studies in peacebuilding?

Black Radical: a Book of Black British poetry that defines struggle

Benjamin Zephaniah and Kadija (George) Sesay are working on Black Radical: a Book of Black British poetry that defines our struggle , a new anthology. They are looking for books, pamphlets, newsletters and newspapers and any ephemera that includes poetry in / on it written by those who define themselves as Black British (including people of Asian descent) born in or who migrated to Britain. They say, "Please send copies (in any format) in the first instance with relevant details of where and when it was first published, copyright details and any other relevant details if you have that information and one of our team will follow through with you. "If you can make any suggestions of other people we should follow up with, and possible places to source material, we’d appreciate it. "Please feel free to share this call out. We already have a small team working on it but we don't want to miss out poems or people! "If you are not sure if material that you

Interview _ Jacob Lund

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Jacob Lund’s poetry has been published in Openings , the annual anthology of The Open University and in N2 Poetry , London. He has worked as a reviewer for the Daily Telegraph , and has published on Shakespeare in academic journals. He lives in Brighton. In this interview, Jacob talks about his writing: When did you start writing? I only began writing poetry seriously about three years ago, though before that I had been published as a book reviewer for the Daily Telegraph ’s youth magazine Juiced . I have also been a contributor to NATE and EMag , writing mostly on Shakespeare and on literary theory. After a conversation with the poet, short story writer and memoirist Dr. John O’Donoghue, I went home and found quite a lot of half-finished poems, fragments, titles, images – and realised that a few of them were probably worth completing. A friend of mine who teaches at the University of Cambridge, Dr. Sean McEvoy, encouraged me to carry on with the work, and I began by giving

Interview _ Deborah Tyler-Bennett

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Deborah Tyler-Bennett is a poet and fiction writer with eight volumes of poems and three volumes of short linked stories to her credit. She is currently working on her first novel, Livin' in a Great Big Way . Her new volume, Ken Dodd Takes a Holiday , will be out from King's England in 2019. Her poems have also been featured in anthologies that include Bollocks to Brexit: an Anthology of Poems and Short Fiction (CivicLeicester, 2019), Leicester 2084 AD: New Poems about The City (CivicLeicester, 2018) and Welcome to Leicester (Dahlia Publishing, 2016). In an earlier interview , Deborah talked about her concerns as a writer, and some of the influences she draws on. In this new interview, Deborah talks about her latest book, Mr Bowlly Regrets , and about poetry and politics: Do you write every day? I do write everyday: on trains; in caf├ęs; in bars; at home; in other settings. I try and give myself a timetable between teaching Adult Ed creative writing, workshops,

Interview _ Deborah Tyler-Bennett

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Deborah Tyler-Bennett ’s forthcoming volume, Ken Dodd Takes a Holiday , is out from King’s England Press in 2019, and her first novel, Livin’ In a Great Big Way is in preparation for the same publisher. She also has two recent volumes from the same publisher – Mr Bowlly Regrets – Poems , and Brand New Beat: Linked Short Fictions Set in the 1960s (both 2017). She’s had seven collections of poetry published, some previous volumes being Napoleon Solo Biscuits (King’s England, 2015), poems based on growing up in the 1960s and ‘70s, and Kinda Keats (Shoestring, 2013), work deriving from a residency at Keats House, Hampstead. Her first collection of linked, 1940s set, short stories, Turned Out Nice Again came out from King’s England in 2013, and a sequel, set in the 1950s, Mice that Roared was published in 2015, Brand New Beat, set in the 1960s , represents the final part of the trilogy. In 2016, The Coffee House Anthology from Charnwood Arts marked the final volume of Coff

Interview _ Gareth Calway

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Gareth Calway is a published poet, novelist, playwright, lyricist and member of folkband, the Penland Phezants . His works include Doin Different (Poppyland, 2016) and Bound for Jamaica  (Collins, 2012). Like Eric Idle and John Major, he resented his birthday (March 29) being stolen for Brexit Day 2019. These poems are his revenge. His poems have also been featured in Bollocks to Brexit: an Anthology of Poems and Short Fiction (CivicLeicester, 2019). In this interview, Gareth talks about his writing: When did you start writing?  At school (late 60s, early 70s). I started by imitating lyrics by 'thinking' groups and artists like the Beatles, Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Hendrix, self-publishing these as lyrics sheets on mock-up fantasy albums by my own fantasy band. At the time, the hippie movement seemed all to my youthful and optimistic mind to be embarked on a search for 'the answer' (many were but some weren't) and I honestly didn’t distinguish much

Interview _ Katherine Cleave

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Katherine Cleave is a Fine Artist living in Barnes. Since graduating from Goldsmiths College, her artwork has been displayed at several London galleries and events. Her work presents an ironic play of words, phrases and images juxtaposed to create a lively stage on which to probe reality. Recent work includes a small collection of poems. In this interview, Katherine talks about her writing: When did you start writing? I started writing during my Thesis in the final year of my BA in Fine Art and Theoretical Criticism. I had based my work on a comparison between the playwright, Luigi Pirandello and the Fine Artist, Jannis Kounellis. The work required a leap of faith but I wanted to show that, in essence, it is not the medium that is important, but the message. I consider myself an artist: sometimes I paint, sometimes I write – with varying degrees of success! How would you describe the writing you are doing? I write poetry. The abstract nature appeals to me and I love the co